Welcome to our HO Scale Product Page
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

Protype

 

 
Pre-Painted Slim the Cowboy Silhouette

1 Slim the Cowboy

 
$4.90
 
 
#020 002 405 003B
Details
 

These are modeled off of Woodcrafts actual plans for their Slim the Cowboy shadow plan. Which brings the Old West to your yard and now your layout with Slim the Cowboy. He's unique and will turn heads.


Options for use:

1) Next to house.

2) Next to garage.

3) By a pole in a garden.


HO Scale
HO Gauge
1:87 Scale
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 
4 Barriers
 
$6.56
 
Buy Now
#020 002 415 010-04
Details
 
 
 
8 Barriers
 
$12.30
 
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#020 002 415 010-08
Details
 
 
 
16 Barriers
 
$23.76
 
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#020 002 415 010-16
Details
 
Details
 

Our Concrete Barriers are made out of a Lead Free white metal and are easily paintable a Concrete Color. They are exact replicas of the 4' Straight V-Block Concrete Barrier.


HO Scale
HO Gauge
1:87 Scale
 
 
 
 

 

 

Prototype

 

Installed Model Images

 

Boxcar Grain Panel Door

18 Panels

 
$8.95
 
# 020 002 810 006
Details

Add just the right amount of detail to more than just your layout! Your rolling stock has a part to play in your miniature empire. Boxcar grain doors have been sought after by model railroaders for years. Add them to boxcar rolling stock, stack them next to tracks, or pile them near a grain elevator. Made from actual laser cut wood, these tiny accessories add the perfect amount of prototypical dimension to layouts everywhere!

Boxcar grain doors were used for containing grain inside boxcars for transit and used well into the late 1980s. All grain hauling railroads in the Midwest, Pacific Northwest, and Canada utilized this method. Back in 1939 sixteen railroads, which included AT&SF, CB&Q, RI, MP, UP, IC, SLSF, MKT, Wabash, Alton, CGW, C&NW, CStPM&O, GN, NP, Soo Line, and Milwaukee Road, set out to divide the expense of grain doors.

The boards would be installed on the inside of the boxcar door and then the grain would be blown into the boxcar over the boards or through chutes in the sides of the boxcar. 40’ boxcars were primarily used, although 50’ boxcars were known to be used if there was a shortage.

This panel method was used in boxcars on narrow gauge lines, short lines, and Class A railroads going back to early railroading when everything was shipped in boxcars. True to their name, grain doors were used almost exclusively in boxcars hauling grain. However, these doors were put into service to haul other supplies like coal, including anthracite; and powdered dolomite limestone.


Options for use:

1)In Boxcar
2)Next to track near Grain Elevator.

 
 
 

Facing Left

 

Prototype

 

 

Slim the Cowboy Silhouette

1 Slim the Cowboy

 
$2.70
 
# 020 002 405 003

These are modeled off of Woodcrafts actual plans for their Slim the Cowboy shadow plan. Which brings the Old West to your yard and now your layout with Slim the Cowboy. He's unique and will turn heads.


Options for use:

1) Next to house.

2) Next to garage.

3) By a pole in a garden.

 
 
 

 

Prototype

Diorama

Storm Sewer Grate & Inlet

6 Grates & Inlets

 
$4.69
 
# 020 002 415 002

This Sewer Grate is an exact replica of the one in the intersection of W. Duluth Ave and S. Massachusetts Ave in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on 05-21-10. This same style has been used since the turn of the 20th century through present day; throughout the Midwest and east coast, from big cities to small towns.

These Sewer Grates & Inlets feature intricate details and are pre-scored to make assemby a snap! Other applications include separate inlet and sewer grate pieces to allow for a more custom fit to your layout.

Options for use:
1) Sewer Grate next to curb and inlet in Curb.

2) Sewer Grate next to curb but inlet not used.

3) Sewer Grate in alley or any where storm water needs to drain.

 
 
 

 

Prototype

Diorama

Manhole Cover

8 Covers & Rings

 
$4.69
 
# 020 002 415 001

This manhole cover is an exact replica of the one in the intersection of W. Duluth Ave and S. Massachusetts Ave in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on 05-21-10. This same style has been used since the turn of the 20th century through present day; throughout the Midwest and east coast, from big cities to small towns.

These manhole covers feature fine details like the webbing and the word 'sewer,' right down to the notch used to lift the cover up. They come with the ring which is the top of the collar of the manhole cover.

Options for use:
1) Main option: Glue ring, making sure the street material is flush with top of ring and glue manhole cover in center of ring.

2) Street repair: Drill hole the size of the ring center and glue ring around the hole making sure the street material is flush with top of the ring. Lay the manhole cover next to it to make it appear as if it is open. Put a barricade by it and a work truck and even a person coming out of the hole.

3) Manhole cover laying around: Put just a couple manhole covers in the back of a work truck.

4) Manhole cover at Public Works Facility: Put a couple manhole covers on a pile or up against a building in a work yard.